Man and Van N1 Removals

Get your quote from the Man and Van N1 Removal Specialists today

Big Red Removals have over 10 years of experience in house and flat moves within N1. We also offer a Man and Van service based on an hourly rate. With this service you get the same professional, fully trained crew as with our removals service.

Our experienced and dedicated team of professional removers will ensure that your move, however big or small goes without a hitch. Big Red has got you covered, able to offer the most competitive Man and Van rates in N1.

Our Man and Van service is designed for smaller N1 removals, single items, or 1 bedroom and smaller 2 bedroom properties. Whether you are looking for a smaller complete removal or just moving bulky items from A to B, our experienced uniformed crews will work until the job is completed. All our crews are from the permanent staff of Big Red Removals and Storage so you get the benefit of using our flexible hourly rate, only paying for the actual time the removal takes, whilst still getting the benefits of using a professional removals company. We never compromise on quality to ensure that our service is always the best around.

All moves with Big Red can be covered with liability insurance. As Members of the National Guild of Removers we follow their Code of Practice and you can be assured that Big Red will give you the best removals service in N1. Each vehicle comes equipped with transit blankets, sofa covers, ties, a skate and a full tool kit. All of our vehicles are satellite tracked, so we know where they are at all times.

All our staff can dismantle/assemble normal furniture, disconnect/connect appliances when applicable and remove doors/windows. With the hourly Man and Van rate, crews have the flexibility to do any last minute packing, additional pick ups, trips to recycling, sofas through windows, etc. We are also able to provide a house clearance service, taking items to charity shops or recycling.

Whatever other stresses you have with your move, you can rely on Big Red to ensure that, from start to finish, the removal process is not one of them. Call the N1 Man and Van specialists now on 0207 228 7651.

Parking N1

Most of the roads around N1 are controlled parking, and either parking suspensions or dispensations are required. For larger Removals in N1 a parking suspension is a necessity. The suspension has to be booked up to 14 working days in advance of the required date. These are booked with your local council online. For smaller N1 removals, using vans, we can load and unload for short periods on single yellow lines. Otherwise a dispensation would need to be booked, if we are packing and N1 flat moving.

A Little Bit About N1

The N postcode district was created in 1917 when it was subdivided into 22 districts. The postal district of N1 covers Barnsbury, Canonbury, King’s Cross, Islington, Pentonville, De Beauvoir Town and Hoxton. The local authorities covering these areas is Islington, Hackney and Camden.

The area of King’s Cross was previously a village known as Battle Bridge or Battlebridge which was an ancient crossing of the River Fleet. The original name of the bridge was Broad Ford Bridge. The name “Battle Bridge” led to a tradition that this was the site of a major battle in AD 60 or 61 between the Romans and the Iceni tribe led by Boudica (also known as Boudicea). The suggestion that Boudica is buried beneath platform 9 or 10 at King’s Cross Station seems to have arisen as urban folklore since the end of World War II .

King’s Cross station, designed by architect Lewis Cubitt and opened in 1852, succeeded a short-lived earlier station, erected north of the canal in time for the Great Exhibition.
St Pancras railway station, built by the Midland Railway, lies immediately to the west. They both had extensive land. The passenger stations on Euston Road far outweighed in public attention the economically more important goods traffic to the north. King’s Cross and St Pancras stations, and indeed all London railway stations, made an important contribution to the capital’s economy.

After World War II the area declined from being a poor but busy industrial and distribution services district to a partially abandoned post-industrial district. By the 1980s it was notorious for prostitution and drug abuse. In the 1990s the government established the King’s Cross Partnership to fund regeneration projects, and the commencement of work on High Speed 1 in 2000 provided a major impetus for other projects. Within a few years much of the “socially undesirable” behaviour had moved on, and new projects such as offices and hotels had begun to open. The area is expected to remain a major focus of redevelopment through the first two decades of the 21st century. The London terminus of the Eurostar international rail service moved to St Pancras station in November 2007. The station’s redevelopment led to the demolition of several buildings, including the Gasworks. Following the opening of the new high speed line to the station, redevelopment of the land between the two major stations and the old Kings Cross railwaylands to the rear has commenced, with outline planning permission granted for the whole site. The site is now called King’s Cross Central and is one of the largest construction projects in Greater London in the first quarter of the 21st century.

For readers of Harry Potter, King’s Cross is where the schoolboy hero boards the train for Hogwarts. The railway station has capitalised on tourist interest by putting up a sign for the fictional “Platform 9 3⁄4” described in the books, and burying a luggage trolley, apparently, half into the wall.