Man and Van WC1 Removals

Get your quote from the Man and Van WC1 Removal Specialists today

Big Red Removals have over 10 years of experience in house and flat moves within WC1. We also offer a Man and Van service based on an hourly rate. With this service you get the same professional, fully trained crew as with our removals service.

Our experienced and dedicated team of professional removers will ensure that your move, however big or small goes without a hitch. Big Red has got you covered, able to offer the most competitive Man and Van rates in WC1.

Our Man and Van service is designed for smaller WC1 removals, single items, or 1 bedroom and smaller 2 bedroom properties. Whether you are looking for a smaller complete removal or just moving bulky items from A to B, our experienced uniformed crews will work until the job is completed. All our crews are from the permanent staff of Big Red Removals and Storage so you get the benefit of using our flexible hourly rate, only paying for the actual time the removal takes, whilst still getting the benefits of using a professional removals company. We never compromise on quality to ensure that our service is always the best around.

All moves with Big Red can be covered with liability insurance. As Members of the National Guild of Removers we follow their Code of Practice and you can be assured that Big Red will give you the best removals service in WC1. Each vehicle comes equipped with transit blankets, sofa covers, ties, a skate and a full tool kit. All of our vehicles are satellite tracked, so we know where they are at all times.

All our staff can dismantle/assemble normal furniture, disconnect/connect appliances when applicable and remove doors/windows. With the hourly Man and Van rate, crews have the flexibility to do any last minute packing, additional pick ups, trips to recycling, sofas through windows, etc. We are also able to provide a house clearance service, taking items to charity shops or recycling.

Whatever other stresses you have with your move, you can rely on Big Red to ensure that, from start to finish, the removal process is not one of them. Call the WC1 Man and Van specialists now on 0207 228 7651.

Parking WC1

Most of the roads around WC1 are controlled parking, and either parking suspensions or dispensations are required. For larger Removals in WC1 a parking suspension is a necessity. The suspension has to be booked up to 14 working days in advance of the required date. These are booked with your local council online. For smaller WC1 removals, using vans, we can load and unload for short periods on single yellow lines. Otherwise a dispensation would need to be booked, if we are packing and WC1 flat moving.

A Little Bit About WC1

The WC postcode area was only established in 1917. The postal district of WC1 covers Bloomsbury, St Pancras, Russell Square, Gray’s Inn, High Holborn, King’s Cross and parts of Finsbury. The local authorities covering these areas are Hammersmith and Fulham and Kensington and Chelsea.

Historically, Bloomsbury is associated with the arts, education, and medicine. The area gives its name to the Bloomsbury Group of artists, the most famous of whom was Virginia Woolf, who met in private homes in the area in the early 1900s, and to the lesser known Bloomsbury Gang of Whigs formed in 1765 by John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford. The publisher Faber & Faber used to be located in Queen Square, though at the time T. S. Eliot was editor the offices were in Tavistock Square. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was founded in John Millais’s parents’ house on Gower Street in 1848.

St Pancras was originally a medieval parish, which ran from close to what is now Oxford Street north as far as Highgate, and from what is now Regent’s Park in the west to the road now known as York Way in the east, boundaries which take in much of the current London Borough of Camden, including the central part of it. However, as the choice of name for the borough suggests, St Pancras has lost its status as the central settlement in the area. The district now encompassed by the term St Pancras is not easy to define, and usage of St Pancras as a place name is fairly limited.

Russell Square is named after the surname of the Earls and Dukes of Bedford, who developed the family’s London landholdings in the 17th and 18th centuries, beginning with Covent Garden (Bedford Street). Russell Square was formed when new streets were laid out by the Duke on the site of the gardens of his former home Bedford House, their London house. Other local street names relating to the Duke of Bedford include Bedford Square, Bedford Place, Bedford Avenue, Bedford Row and Bedford Way; Woburn Square and Woburn Place (from Woburn Abbey); Tavistock Square, Tavistock Place and Tavistock Street (Marquess of Tavistock), and Thornhaugh Street (after a subsidiary title Baron of Thornhaugh). The street lamps around this area carry the Bedford Arms.

The area of Gray’s Inn Road was clearly populated from palaeolithic times and a gravel bed off Gray’s Inn Lane was the find spot for the c.350,000 year-old Gray’s Inn Lane Hand Axe in 1679, one of the important artefacts in the emerging consciousness of human antiquity, now in the British Museum. Given the road’s height above the Fleet valley, it may have formed part of an ancient trackway.

In the 18th century, Holborn was the location of the infamous Mother Clap’s molly house but in the modern era High Holborn has become a centre for entertainment venues to suit more general tastes: 22 inns or taverns were recorded in the 1860s and the Holborn Empire, originally Weston’s Music Hall, stood between 1857 and 1960, when it was pulled down after structural damage sustained in the Blitz. Charles Dickens took up residence in Furnival’s Inn, on the site of the former Prudential building designed by Alfred Waterhouse now named “Holborn Bars”. Dickens put his character “Pip”, in Great Expectations, in residence at Barnard’s Inn opposite, now occupied by Gresham College.