Covent Garden Removals

Get your quote from the Covent Garden Removal Specialists today

It is well known that moving is one of the most stressful times in anyone's life, so leave it to the best in the business. Big Red Removals have over 10 years of experience in house and flat moves within Covent Garden.

Big Red offer a range of services to suit any move, large or small. We can offer a full or partial packing service to ensure that your precious possessions reach their destination intact. Our experienced and dedicated team of professional removers will ensure that your move goes without a hitch. From offering a full site survey for larger moves to flexible hourly rates for smaller moves, Big Red have got you covered, able to offer the most competitive rates in Covent Garden.

All of our staff are fully trained, uniformed and experienced but most of all they are friendly and happy to help. Our fleet of vans are fully equipped with transit blankets, sofa covers, ties, a skate and a full tool kit.

All moves with Big Red can be covered with liability insurance. As Members of the National Guild of Removers we follow their Code of Practice and you can be assured that Big Red will give you the best removals service in Covent Garden.

Whatever other stresses you have with your move, you can rely on Big Red to ensure that, from start to finish, the removal process is not one of them. Call the Covent Garden removals specialists now on 0207 228 7651.


Parking Covent Garden

Most of the roads around Covent Garden are controlled parking, and either parking suspensions or dispensations are required. For larger Removals in Covent Garden a parking suspension is a necessity. The suspension has to be booked 10 calendar days in advance of the required date. These are booked with City of Westminster council online. For smaller Covent Garden removals, using vans, we can load and unload for short periods on single yellow lines. Otherwise a dispensation would need to be booked, if we are packing and Covent Garden flat moving.

For parking and other council information please click here City of Westminster Council.

A Little Bit About Covent Garden

Covent Garden is associated with the former fruit and vegetable market in the central square, now a popular shopping and tourist site, and the Royal Opera House, which is also known as “Covent Garden”. Though mainly fields until the 16th century, the area was briefly settled when it became the heart of the Anglo-Saxon trading town of Lundenwic. After the town was abandoned, part of the area was walled off by 1200 for use as arable land and orchards by Westminster Abbey, and was referred to as “the garden of the Abbey and Convent”. The land, now called “the Covent Garden”, was seized by Henry VIII, and granted to the Earls of Bedford in 1552.

A small open-air fruit and vegetable market had developed on the south side of the fashionable square by 1654. Gradually, both the market and the surrounding area fell into disrepute, as taverns, theatres, coffee-houses and brothels opened up; the gentry moved away, and rakes, wits and playwrights moved in. By the 18th century it had become a well-known red-light district, attracting notable prostitutes. An Act of Parliament was drawn up to control the area, and Charles Fowler’s neo-classical building was erected in 1830 to cover and help organise the market. The area declined as a pleasure-ground as the market grew and further buildings were added: the Floral Hall, Charter Market, and in 1904 the Jubilee Market. By the end of the 1960s traffic congestion was causing problems, and in 1974 the market relocated to the New Covent Garden Market about three miles (5 km) south-west at Nine Elms. The central building re-opened as a shopping centre in 1980, and is now a tourist location containing cafes, pubs, small shops, and a craft market called the Apple Market, along with another market held in the Jubilee Hall.

The Covent Garden Estate was part of Beecham Estates and Pills Limited from 1924 to 1928, after which time it was managed by a successor company called Covent Garden Properties Company Limited, owned by the Beechams and other private investors. This new company sold some properties at Covent Garden, while becoming active in property investment in other parts of London. In 1962 the bulk of the remaining properties in the Covent Garden area, including the market, were sold to the newly established government-owned Covent Garden Authority for £3,925,000. In 1979, Covent Garden Market reopened as a retail centre; in 2010, the largest Apple Store in the world opened in The Piazza. The central hall has shops, cafes and bars alongside the Apple Market stalls selling antiques, jewellery, clothing and gifts; there are additional casual stalls in the Jubilee Hall Market on the south side of the square. Long Acre has a range of clothes shops and boutiques, and Neal Street is noted for its large number of shoe shops. London Transport Museum and the side entrance to the Royal Opera House box office and other facilities are also located on the square.