Lambeth Removals

Get your quote from the Lambeth Removal Specialists today

It is well known that moving is one of the most stressful times in anyone's life, so leave it to the best in the business. Big Red Removals have over 10 years of experience in house and flat moves within Lambeth.

Big Red offer a range of services to suit any move, large or small. We can offer a full or partial packing service to ensure that your precious possessions reach their destination intact. Our experienced and dedicated team of professional removers will ensure that your move goes without a hitch. From offering a full site survey for larger moves to flexible hourly rates for smaller moves, Big Red have got you covered, able to offer the most competitive rates in Lambeth.

All of our staff are fully trained, uniformed and experienced but most of all they are friendly and happy to help. Our fleet of vans are fully equipped with transit blankets, sofa covers, ties, a skate and a full tool kit.

All moves with Big Red can be covered with liability insurance. As Members of the National Guild of Removers we follow their Code of Practice and you can be assured that Big Red will give you the best removals service in Lambeth.

Whatever other stresses you have with your move, you can rely on Big Red to ensure that, from start to finish, the removal process is not one of them. Call the Lambeth removals specialists now on 0207 228 7651.


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Parking in Lambeth

Most of the roads around Lambeth are controlled parking, and either parking suspensions or dispensations are required. For larger Removals in Lambeth a parking suspension is a necessity. The suspension has to be booked 5 working days in advance of the required date. These are booked with Lambeth Council online. For smaller Lambeth removals, using vans, we can load and unload for short periods on single yellow lines. Otherwise a dispensation would need to be booked, if we are packing and Lambeth flat moving.

For parking and other council information please click here Lambeth Council online.

A Little Bit About Lambeth

The origins of the name of Lambeth come from its first record in 1062 as Lambehitha, meaning ‘landing place for lambs’, and in 1255 as Lambeth. In the Domesday Book, Lambeth is called “Lanchei”, likely in error.[3] The name refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English ‘lamb’ and ‘hythe’.[4] South Lambeth is recorded as Sutlamehethe in 1241 and North Lambeth is recorded in 1319 as North Lamhuth.[4]

The manor of Lambeth is recorded as being under ownership of the Archbishop of Canterbury from at least 1190.[5] The Archbishops led the development of much of the manor, with Archbishop Hubert Walter creating the residence of Lambeth Palace in 1197.[6] Lambeth and the palace were the site of two important 13th century international treaties; the Treaty of Lambeth 1217 and the Treaty of Lambeth 1212.[7] Edward, the Black Princelived in Lambeth in the 14th century in an estate that incorporated the land not belonging to the Archbishops, which also included Kennington (the Black Prince road in Lambeth is named after him).[6] As such, much of the freehold land of Lambeth to this day remains under Royal ownership as part of the estate of the Duchy of Cornwall.[8] Lambeth was also the site of the principal medieval London residence of the Dukes of Norfolk, but by 1680 the large house had been sold and ended up as a pottery manufacturer, creating some of the first examples of English delftware in the country.[9] The road names, Norfolk Place and Norfolk Row reflect the history and legacy of the house today.[10]

Map of 1897, showing Lambeth Palace and Lambeth Bridge

Lambeth Palace lies opposite the southern section of the Palace of Westminster on the Thames. The two were historically linked by a horse ferry across the river.[5] Until the mid-18th century the north of Lambeth was marshland, crossed by a number of roads raised against floods. The marshland in the area, known as Lambeth Marshe, was drained in the 18th century but is remembered in the Lower Marsh street name. With the opening of Westminster Bridge in 1750, followed by the Blackfriars BridgeVauxhall Bridge and Lambeth Bridge itself, a number of major thoroughfares were developed through Lambeth, such as Westminster Bridge Road, Kennington Road and Camberwell New Road.[5] Until the 18th century Lambeth was still partly rural in nature, being outside the boundaries of central London, although it had experienced growth in the form of taverns and entertainment venues, such as theatres and Bear pits (being outside inner city regulations).[9] The subsequent growth in road and marine transport, along with the development of industry in the wake of the industrial revolution brought great change to the area.[9]

The area grew with an ever-increasing population at this time, many of whom were considerably poor.[9] As a result, Lambeth opened a parish workhouse in 1726. In 1777 a parliamentary report recorded a parish workhouse in operation accommodating up to 270 inmates. On 18 December 1835 the Lambeth Poor Law Parish was formed, comprising the parish of St Mary, Lambeth, “including the district attached to the new churches of St John, Waterloo, Kennington, Brixton, Norwood”. Its operation was overseen by an elected Board of twenty Guardians.[11] Following in the tradition of earlier delftware manufacturers, the Royal Doulton Pottery company had their principle manufacturing site in Lambeth for several centuries.[12] The Lambeth factory closed in 1956 and production was transferred to Staffordshire. However the Doulton offices, located on Black Prince Road still remain as they are a listed building, which includes the original decorative tiling.[12]

Between 1801 and 1831 the population of Lambeth trebled and in ten years alone between 1831 and 1841 it increased from 87,856 in to 105,883.[10] The railway first came to Lambeth in the 1840s, as construction began which extended the London and South Western Railway from its original station at Nine Elms to the new terminus at Waterloo via the newly constructed Nine Elms to Waterloo Viaduct. With the massive urban development of London in the 19th century and with the opening of the large Waterloo railway station in 1848 the locality around the station and Lower Marsh became known as Waterloo, becoming an area distinct from Lambeth itself.[4]

The Lambeth Ragged school was built in 1851 to help educate the children of destitute facilities, although the widening of the London and South Western Railway in 1904 saw the building reduced in size.[9] Part of the school building still exists today and is occupied by the Beaconsfield Gallery.[9] The Beaufoy Institute was also built in 1907 to provide technical education for the poor of the area, although this stopped being an educational institution at the end of the 20th century.[9]

Lambeth Walk and Lambeth High Street were the two principle commercial streets of Lambeth, but today are predominantly residential in nature. Lambeth Walk was site of a market for many years, which by 1938 had 159 shops, including 11 butchers.[13] The street and surrounding roads, like most of Lambeth were extensively damaged in the Second World War.[13] This included the complete destruction of the Victorian Swimming Baths (themselves built in 1897) in 1945, when a V2 Rocket hit the street resulting in the deaths of 37 people.[14]

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s headquarters were located in Lambeth High Street from 1976 until 2015.[15]