Lincoln’s Inn Fields Removals

Get your quote from the Lincoln’s Inn Fields Removal Specialists today

It is well known that moving is one of the most stressful times in anyone's life, so leave it to the best in the business. Big Red Removals have over 10 years of experience in house and flat moves within Lincoln’s Inn Fields.

Big Red offer a range of services to suit any move, large or small. We can offer a full or partial packing service to ensure that your precious possessions reach their destination intact. Our experienced and dedicated team of professional removers will ensure that your move goes without a hitch. From offering a full site survey for larger moves to flexible hourly rates for smaller moves, Big Red have got you covered, able to offer the most competitive rates in Lincoln’s Inn Fields.

All of our staff are fully trained, uniformed and experienced but most of all they are friendly and happy to help. Our fleet of vans are fully equipped with transit blankets, sofa covers, ties, a skate and a full tool kit.

All moves with Big Red can be covered with liability insurance. As Members of the National Guild of Removers we follow their Code of Practice and you can be assured that Big Red will give you the best removals service in Lincoln’s Inn Fields.

Whatever other stresses you have with your move, you can rely on Big Red to ensure that, from start to finish, the removal process is not one of them. Call the Lincoln’s Inn Fields removals specialists now on 0207 228 7651.


51.5105587-0.1308838

Parking in Lincoln’s Inn Fields

All of the roads around Lincoln’s Inn Fields are controlled parking, and either parking suspensions or dispensations are required.

For larger Removals in Lincoln’s Inn Fields a parking suspension is a necessity. The suspension has to be booked 14 calendar days and 3 working days in advance of the required date with Camden council online.

Smaller Lincoln’s Inn Fields removals, using vans, we can load and unload for short periods on single yellow lines. Otherwise a dispensation would need to be booked, if we are packing and Lincoln’s Inn Fields flat moving.

 

A Little Bit About Lincoln’s Inn Fields

Lincoln’s Inn Fields is the largest public square in London. It was laid out in the 1630s under the initiative of the speculative builder and contractor William Newton. The grounds, which had remained private property, were acquired by London County Council in 1895. Lincoln’s Inn Fields takes its name from the adjacent Lincoln’s Inn, of which the private gardens are separated from the Fields by a perimeter wall and a large gatehouse. The grassed area in the centre of the Fields contains a court for tennis and netball and a bandstand. It was previously used for corporate events, but these are no longer permitted. Cricket and other sports are thought to have been played here in the 18th century.

As London fashion moved west, Lincoln’s Inn Fields was left to rich lawyers who were attracted by its proximity to the Inns of Court. Thus, the former Newcastle House became in 1790 the premises of the solicitors Farrer & Co who are still there: their clients include much of the landed gentry and also Queen Elizabeth II. Lincoln’s Inn Fields was the site, in 1683, of the public beheading of Lord William Russell, son of the first Duke of Bedford, following his implication in the Rye House Plot for the attempted assassination of King Charles II. The executioner was Jack Ketch who made such a poor job of it that four axe blows were required before the head was separated from the body and, after the first stroke, Russell looked up and said to him “You dog, did I give you 10 guineas to use me so inhumanely?”.

In the 1980s, Lincoln’s Inn Fields attracted many homeless people who slept there overnight. In 1992, they were cleared out, fences were raised, and since the re-opening of Lincoln’s Inn Fields with its new railings in 1993, gates have been locked every night at dusk. However, although no homeless people now reside, a vestige of their presence is the soup-vans which continue to visit Lincoln’s Inn Fields nightly, along the east side adjacent to Lincoln’s Inn, providing free food to queues of homeless people who assemble at dark to collect the food and then disappear. The vans are operated by a variety of religious organisations.