Mill Hill Removals

Get your quote from the Mill Hill Removal Specialists today

It is well known that moving is one of the most stressful times in anyone's life, so leave it to the best in the business. Big Red Removals have over 10 years of experience in house and flat moves within Mill Hill.

Big Red offer a range of services to suit any move, large or small. We can offer a full or partial packing service to ensure that your precious possessions reach their destination intact. Our experienced and dedicated team of professional removers will ensure that your move goes without a hitch. From offering a full site survey for larger moves to flexible hourly rates for smaller moves, Big Red have got you covered, able to offer the most competitive rates in Mill Hill.

All of our staff are fully trained, uniformed and experienced but most of all they are friendly and happy to help. Our fleet of vans are fully equipped with transit blankets, sofa covers, ties, a skate and a full tool kit.

All moves with Big Red can be covered with liability insurance. As Members of the National Guild of Removers we follow their Code of Practice and you can be assured that Big Red will give you the best removals service in Mill Hill.

Whatever other stresses you have with your move, you can rely on Big Red to ensure that, from start to finish, the removal process is not one of them. Call the Mill Hill removals specialists now on 0207 228 7651.


51.6164774-0.220377

Parking in Mill Hill

Most of the roads around Mill Hill are controlled parking, and either parking suspensions or dispensations are required. For larger Removals in Mill Hill a parking suspension is a necessity. The suspension has to be booked 5 working days in advance of the required date. These are booked with Barnet council online. For smaller Mill Hill removals, using vans, we can load and unload for short periods on single yellow lines. Otherwise a dispensation would need to be booked, if we are packing and Mill Hill flat moving.

For parking and other council information please click here Barnet Council.

A Little Bit About Mill Hill

Mill Hill’s name was first recorded as Myllehill in 1547 and appears to mean “hill with a windmill”. However, the workings of the original Mill are in the building adjacent to the Mill Field. Mill Hill Village is the oldest known inhabited part of the district, a ribbon development along a medieval route called ‘The Ridgeway’. It is thought that the name ‘Mill Hill’ may be derived from a mill on The Ridgeway, built on an area of open ground (now a park) known as The Mill Field. The village is bounded on the north and the south by Green Belt land, and its High Street, at 100 yards, is the shortest in London. The area’s proximity to the city made it popular as a country retreat from the 17th century onwards, and large houses and quaint cottages survive. William Wilberforce (MP, and abolitionist of the slave trade) and Sir Stamford Raffles (founder of colonial Singapore) both briefly resided here.

The Inglis Barracks at Mill Hill East were home to the Middlesex Regiment between 1905 and 1962. The 1941 reopening of the railway station, under war-time conditions, was to allow easy access to the barracks. As military needs changed over the years, the land of the barracks has been progressively sold to private developers. The army postal depot was located here before moving to Northolt. In 1988, a 23-year-old soldier Michael Robbins was killed and nine others injured by an IRA bomb blast.

In 1749 the botanist Peter Collinson inherited an estate which is now part of Mill Hill School, here he created a botanical garden. The lexicographer James Murray started work on the first Oxford English Dictionary in 1879, whilst teaching at Mill Hill School. He had a building built in the school grounds to house the quotation slips and his small editorial staff. Murray called this building his scriptorium, when the project moved to Oxford the building was used by the school as a reading room. During the Second World War the Maudsley Hospital moved to the evacuated Mill Hill School as the Mill Hill Emergency Hospital. Here John C. Raven developed a verbal intelligence test called the Mill Hill Vocabulary scale. The University of London Observatory is a teaching astronomical observatory which is part of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at University College London. It is situated on the A41 Watford Way, southeast of The Broadway. The Observatory was opened on 8 October 1929 by the Astronomer Royal Frank Watson Dyson. The National Institute for Medical Research is a large medical research facility situated on the Ridgeway. Researchers at the Institute have, amongst other achievements, developed liquid and gas chromatography, discovered interferon and also discovered the sex determining gene SRY.