Peckham Removals

Get your quote from the Peckham Removal Specialists today

It is well known that moving is one of the most stressful times in anyone's life, so leave it to the best in the business. Big Red Removals have over 10 years of experience in house and flat moves within Peckham.

Big Red offer a range of services to suit any move, large or small. We can offer a full or partial packing service to ensure that your precious possessions reach their destination intact. Our experienced and dedicated team of professional removers will ensure that your move goes without a hitch. From offering a full site survey for larger moves to flexible hourly rates for smaller moves, Big Red have got you covered, able to offer the most competitive rates in Peckham.

All of our staff are fully trained, uniformed and experienced but most of all they are friendly and happy to help. Our fleet of vans are fully equipped with transit blankets, sofa covers, ties, a skate and a full tool kit.

All moves with Big Red can be covered with liability insurance. As Members of the National Guild of Removers we follow their Code of Practice and you can be assured that Big Red will give you the best removals service in Peckham.

Whatever other stresses you have with your move, you can rely on Big Red to ensure that, from start to finish, the removal process is not one of them. Call the Peckham removals specialists now on 0207 228 7651.


51.474191-0.069137

Parking in Peckham

Most of the roads around Peckham are controlled parking, and either parking suspensions or dispensations are required. For larger Removals in Peckham a parking suspension is a necessity. The suspension has to be booked 5 days in advance of the required date. These are booked with Southwark council online. For smaller Peckham removals, using vans, we can load and unload for short periods on single yellow lines. Otherwise a dispensation would need to be booked, if we are packing and Peckham flat moving.

For parking and other council information please click here Southwark Council.

A Little Bit About Peckham

‘Peckham’ is a Saxon place name meaning the village of the River Peck, a small stream that ran through the district until it was enclosed in 1823. Archaeological evidence indicates earlier Roman occupation in the area, although the name of this settlement is lost. Peckham appears in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Pecheham. It was held by the Bishop of Lisieux from the Bishop of Bayeux. Its Domesday assets were: 2 hides. It had land for 1 plough, 2 acres (8,100 m2) of meadow. It rendered £1 10s 0d (£1.50).

The manor was owned by King Henry I who gave it to his son Robert, Earl of Gloucester. When Robert married the heiress to Camberwell the two manors were united under royal ownership. King John probably hunted at Peckham and local anecdotes suggest that the right to an annual fair was granted to celebrate a particularly good day’s sport. The fair grew to be a rowdy major event lasting three weeks until its abolition in 1827. The village was the last stopping point for many cattle drovers taking their livestock for sale in London. At the beginning of the 19th century Peckham was a “small, quiet, retired village surrounded by fields”. Since 1744 stagecoaches had travelled with an armed guard between Peckham and London to give protection from highwaymen. The rough roads constrained traffic so a branch of the Grand Surrey Canal was proposed as a route from the Thames to Portsmouth.

North Peckham was heavily redeveloped in the 1960s, consisting mainly of high-rise flats to rehouse people from dilapidated old houses. It was popular on its completion for offering a high quality and modern standing of living. However, high unemployment and a lack of economic opportunities led to urban decay and a period of decline in the late 1970s. The North Peckham Estate became one of the most deprived residential areas in Western Europe. Vandalism, graffiti, arson attacks, burglaries, robberies and muggings were commonplace, and the area became an archetypal London sink estate. As a result, the area was subjected to a £290 million regeneration programme in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

The Ballad of Peckham Rye, a 1960 novel by Muriel Spark, is set in Peckham. Peckham was the setting of the television sitcom Only Fools and Horses, although the series was filmed elsewhere in its run as a regular series from 1981 to 1991 as well as Christmas specials until 2003. The spin-off, Rock & Chips, was also set in Peckham in the 1960s.
The television situation comedy Desmond’s was made by Channel 4 and was filmed and set in Peckham.