Shoreditch Removals

Get your quote from the Shoreditch Removal Specialists today

It is well known that moving is one of the most stressful times in anyone's life, so leave it to the best in the business. Big Red Removals have over 10 years of experience in house and flat moves within Shoreditch.

Big Red offer a range of services to suit any move, large or small. We can offer a full or partial packing service to ensure that your precious possessions reach their destination intact. Our experienced and dedicated team of professional removers will ensure that your move goes without a hitch. From offering a full site survey for larger moves to flexible hourly rates for smaller moves, Big Red have got you covered, able to offer the most competitive rates in Shoreditch.

All of our staff are fully trained, uniformed and experienced but most of all they are friendly and happy to help. Our fleet of vans are fully equipped with transit blankets, sofa covers, ties, a skate and a full tool kit.

All moves with Big Red can be covered with liability insurance. As Members of the National Guild of Removers we follow their Code of Practice and you can be assured that Big Red will give you the best removals service in Shoreditch.

Whatever other stresses you have with your move, you can rely on Big Red to ensure that, from start to finish, the removal process is not one of them. Call the Shoreditch removals specialists now on 0207 228 7651.


51.523728-0.0793358

Parking in Shoreditch

Most of the roads around Shoreditch are controlled parking, and either parking suspensions or dispensations are required. For larger Removals in Shoreditch a parking suspension is a necessity. The suspension has to be booked 7 days in advance of the required date. These are booked with Hackney council online. For smaller Shoreditch removals, using vans, we can load and unload for short periods on single yellow lines. Otherwise a dispensation would need to be booked, if we are packing and Shoreditch flat moving.

For parking and other council information please click here Hackney Council.

A Little Bit About Shoreditch

One legend holds that Shoreditch was originally named “Shore’s Ditch”, after Jane Shore, the mistress of Edward IV, who is supposed to have died or been buried in a ditch in the area. This legend is commemorated today by a large painting, at Haggerston Branch Library, of Jane Shore being retrieved from the ditch, and by a design on glazed tiles in a shop in Shoreditch High Street showing her meeting Edward IV. However, the area was known as “Soersditch” long before Jane Shore’s life. A more plausible origin for the name is “Sewer Ditch”, in reference to a drain or watercourse in what was once a boggy area. It may have referred to the headwaters of the river Walbrook, which rose in the Curtain Road area.

In 1576 James Burbage built the first playhouse in England, known as ‘The Theatre’, on the site of the Priory. Some of Shakespeare’s plays were performed here and at the nearby Curtain Theatre. It was here that Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet gained ‘Curtain plaudits’ and where Henry V was performed within ‘this wooden O’. The suburb of Shoreditch was attractive as a location for these early theatres because it was outside the jurisdiction of the somewhat puritanical City fathers.

During the 17th century, wealthy traders and Huguenot silk weavers moved to the area, establishing a textile industry centred to the south around Spitalfields. By the 19th century Shoreditch was also the locus of the furniture industry, now commemorated in the Geffrye Museum on Kingsland Road. However the area declined along with both textile and furniture industries and by the end of the 19th Century Shoreditch was a byword for crime, prostitution and poverty. This situation was not improved by extensive devastation of the housing stock in the Blitz during World War II and insensitive redevelopment in the post war period.

Formerly a predominantly working class area, Shoreditch and Hoxton have, in recent years, been gentrified by the creative industries and those who work in them. Former industrial buildings have been converted to offices and flats, while Curtain Road and Old Street are notable for their clubs and pubs which offer a variety of venues to rival those of the West End. Art galleries, bars, restaurants, media businesses and the building of the Hackney Community College campus are further features of this transformation.